EA’s Command & Conquer Cash Grab

 

 

To many EA are viewed as one of the scourges of the video game world, a triple A behemoth that acquires and assimilates studios, most often to the detriment of fans and their beloved games. A company that is viewed as gluttonous for money and unscrupulous in their quest to fill their coffers, at the expense of delivering the best games and services they could. Well, frankly those people are far from being wrong.

 

EA’s reputation for being one of the most cut-throat companies in the industry precedes them and for good reason. Moving from gaffe to farce it has laid bare its modus operandi, which is purely to profit by any means necessary. As can be seen with some examples from their collection of scandals, most infamously and recently the ruckus caused by Star Wars Battlefront 2 loot boxes. Okay, they did backtrack on that decision but just look at the worlds of Fifa and Madden and their in game purchases. You’ll soon see how EA made $1.68 billion through microtransactions, subscriptions and DLC last year.

 

Now in general in the ongoing debate surrounding their practice, I’ve been a quiet onlooker tutting in distaste at their actions, noting it all with a shake of my head. This time however they’ve crossed a line I had subconsciously drawn in the sand. They’ve opted to revive one of the seminal real-time strategy games as a mobile game. It was announced at E3 to great internet uproar, that the game which alongside StarCraft and Warcraft shaped the landscape of a genre and helped populate it with players, is to be made into a mere mobile app.
 

What C&C Was To Me

Following the success of the 1995 Command & Conquer release which welcomed us to a near future of a Tiberium contaminated Earth, Westwood Studios released a second game set as a prequel to the Tiberium series. Known as Red Alert it was set in an alternate timeline where the Soviets had waged war against the Allies in the wake of the Cold War. This was the series I really got my teeth into and was my first bite of RTS games (sorry GDI and NOD, Allies and Soviets forever.)

 

Way back, as a wee lad of 6 years old in the year of ’96 I have vivid memories of playing Red Alert in awe on my mates step-dads PC. Even at barely over half a decade old I fell in love with the idea of controlling troops to outwit the enemy, especially those darned sweet attack dogs. I mean just look at the cute butter wouldn’t melt one bite one kill bastards…

 
Attack Dogs

 

 

As a series it had so much character and flare, making a great concept simple but most importantly extremely enjoyable gameplay. Just look at the trailer, for the time it must have been mind-blowing, especially if like me you love all things military (it’s not a phase mum,) it even filled me with an intense urge to play watching it back now.

 

The game had a soundtrack that really blew your bollocks off and made you feel like you were riding into battle alongside the action, it’s just so intense. To this day just hearing the ‘Hell March’ gets me in the mood to do some commanding and conquering instantaneously.

 

 

 

 

To me what really gave this specific C&C series character was the satirical and humorous take on the superpowers of the East and West in the campaigns and cut-scenes. This coupled with further characterisation in their building, tech and troop types made it an absolute delight of light-hearted parody. It was funny, often poignant and at times quite kitsch and to me this means that Red Alert: 2 was the epitome of the series because it captured all this the best. Have a cheeky peek at the opening cut scene to get a flavour of what I mean;

 

 

The series eventually fizzled out with releases that didn’t particularly live up to their predecessors’ names and so of course popularity dwindled. It is apt to note that EA took over Westwood Studios in 1998 and closed it in 2003. For all the years that it has laid dormant since the last 2013 release people have called for its revival, however no fan ever expected or ever wanted it to look like this.

Taking something so ground-breaking and influential in the rise in popularity of the genre, a game that was so instantly recognisable for its style and great gameplay and turning it into …. well just watch and see;

 

 

At time of writing 2.1k likes, 50k dislikes on that trailer.

 

 

Command A Cash-cow

C&C Rivals is but a mere husk of the franchises former glory days and in my opinion looks barely indistinguishable from any other ten a penny mobile game I see advertised all over social media. EA have created a knock-off version of a title they acquired, originally created by a studio they closed.

 

Yes perhaps you might say I’m falling foul of what I accused certain Fallout fans of in a previous article and yes, change isn’t always bad, just in this situation there’s no redeeming features. I’m not simply lamenting a different take on a treasured game, it’s the outright relegation of a pivotal series in the RTS genre to nothing more than a mobile game. EA are clearly looking to compete in that reputedly exploitative market with a nostalgic big hitting name. They think C&C is in the same gutter as pay-to-win games such as Clash Royale.

Now I am not entirely opposed to mobile games or even C&C ones at that, it’s more the practice of an exploitative market which all but forces you to make in-game purchases owing to dodgy games mechanics designed to do just that. Bringing out a new name in the series on mobile alone is an outright insult to a prestigious legacy.

 

Mock it

EA have made an obvious attempt to cash in on the pay to win aspects of mobile games using one of the biggest names in RTS history as nothing more than a cash-cow. Shame on them.

 

 

Total War Saga: Thrones Of Britannia – First Impressions Review

 

 

When May the 3rd came, with it arrived the release of the first instalment of a new Total War series in a long lineage of the franchises’ successes, well loved by me. I was proper looking forward to playing it, especially since it was focusing on a period of tumultuous history that I find so interesting. Set in 878 AD after the Viking invasions and surrounding the struggles amongst the many kingdoms of Britannia. The land where I live, albeit now a United Kingdom (not to forget Ireland too of course).

Alas some bad planning on my part had meant that I’d be in Scotland to see my folks for a well needed break, drat. Well after my trip, I’ve finally got to put some thoroughly anticipated hours in and experienced enough turn based fun to give you my first impressions. So I’ll get right on with that considering I’ve taken a while!

I guess life will always … uhhh … find a way to get in between us and gaming for reasons both good and bad.
LIFE UHHH FINDS A WAY

 

 

Developers Creative Assembly take great pride in delivering authentic story driven games, so let me join them in that tradition of theirs in my look at the fruits of their labour. Let me set the scene for you with my first experience of the game;

After arriving late back from Scotland on the 6th of May I decided to get it installed, however fate would have it that my PC would give up the ghost that very night which required no end of tinkering for my non-technical Neanderthal mind to fix it. So I returned from the homeland of my Gaelic ancestors to a battle of wit and grit (mostly dust) with my PC. I finally sat victorious on my throne with it before me, king once more and ready to enter the fray.

I was immediately at least 5 times more excited as I watched the cinematic opening scene, which does great at painting the picture of the historical landscape your saga will take place in. Stunningly beautiful and doing wonders in condensing history into an introduction that legitimately got me even more fired up to play it, which I didn’t think possible. Well they managed it, ringing true to Creative Assembly’s custom and making the game you’re about to play feel like a labour of love from the get go, combining historical facts and drama to great storytelling effect. I felt I knew it was going to be another success from that moment in my eyes.

I had a brief overlook of some of the faction choices and quickly chose who I knew in my heart of hearts I’d be choosing and had been most looking forward to playing. It was only fitting it should be the Gaels considering the lead up to this. Besides I am always eager to play the underdogs of history and half of my lineage. So I chose the ancestors of the Scots with the kingdom of Circenn.

 

 

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After loading in, which I must say feels faster and smoother for me than other recent games in the franchise, which was nice and consistent throughout. I was met with another cinematic setting of scenes specific to my faction choice which again was stunning and helped immerse me further. Immediately this game hit me like a cavalry charge to the rear with just how beautiful it looked. From the cut scenes to the map and units all the way down to details in the unit cards and UI in general. Very pleasing on the eye both graphically and stylistically.

 

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What I’ve felt playing so far is that the game mechanics are meant to make the game a slower pace, putting a higher focus on well considered strategic management and foresight. As compared with, say, the faster paced flightiness of the Warhammer series in the game. However despite this clear intent it doesn’t particularity nail it. My playstyle is always rapid expansion until I collapse from internal strife (I’m a sadomasochist I know) yet despite me clearly not playing this particular take on the game as intended I have found it to be very forgiving. I always scrape through by the skin of my teeth, even though I have essentially been playing it badly. I am playing it on normal, however a criticism from the wider Total War community so far is that it’s too easy and I would tend to agree from my experience. However I feel this isn’t necessarily a bad thing as it does make it more accessible to those who may not be as good as other players or fanatics of the series but it has been announced it will be evened out with a few tweaks of balancing to enhance the difficulty with an update that is currently in Beta.  So we can see how the victory conditions and overabundance of resources will be changed to address the feedback given on these issues, has to be said it’s a nice rapid response time we’ve seen, with the update coming to Beta just under a fortnight since its release.

In my game I took alliances with my kinsman surrounding me (at least those that would have me) and doing so, was quickly dragged into a war against the Orkneyjar Vikings to the North and so decided to declare friendship with the Vikings of Northmbyre to the South. My plan to over-expand had worked and I had immediately made things harder for myself. Until eventually I was surrounded by enemies as the Vikings and I swallowed up my former Gaelic allies. I felt if I hadn’t manufactured my own difficulty I would have been finding the game a bit too easy as I wasn’t really struggling except through my own engineered stupidity and even then coping (I guess that’s how I’ve survived life so long in general to be honest.)

Anyways enough of my story with the game so far let me look at the meat of the matter, so I can better explain my impressions of the game to you and tell you more of what I think.

 

 

 

History And Art Style

Both historically and stylistically in my eyes this game really gets it right on both counts simultaneously. The art style overall is very suited to the period and I think I’m right in thinking that inspiration has been taken from the art of the period. Such as the unit cards amongst other images, highly reflecting the Pictish stone engravings we have found in archaeological digs.

 

Pictish Stone men

 

It is both beautiful and for the most part historically stylised for the era, a really lovely aspect of the game.

I have to say Total War is one of the only games in which I do not turn the music off, usually I get distracted by it and it annoys me. However the music of this game is of such high quality and thematically fitting that it only serves to immerse me further, absolutely spot on and something I’ve come to expect from Creative Assembly who have won awards in the past for their games music.
There is your usual quotes and poetic verses from the era in loading pages. The factions are historically accurate and it all feels very on the mark historically speaking. You’ve got your nice cultural bonuses and faction relevant details as well as units, giving each a unique play style, although there is less variety owing to the focus in game. But still plenty to give you the urge for more playthroughs.

 

Map And Settlement Design

In my earlier article taking a look at the game pre-release, I mentioned that this one was billed to be the most detailed Total War map of Britain yet, 23 times bigger than the entire Attila campaign map, despite being focussed on one of the smallest regions dealt with in any Total War game.

It feels really vast, so well detailed and geographically pleasing with regards to terrain and it’s great to finally see Britain at a larger scale, personally speaking. I feel that there is a Total War for everyone and despite them all being for me, this one in particular is doubly so because of this.

 

The settlements are well designed and are varied and detailed, making a nice setup for both naval and land siege battles.

 

 

Game Mechanics

Overall as previously mentioned, this is a slower paced game with a larger need for strategic foresight than is necessary in other recent titles. With a return to a more in depth take on faction management as we have seen in past Total War games such as the medieval series. Let me tell you why this is the case, what has changed and how it plays.

 

–  Main Settlements And Smaller Holdings;

The fact that main settlements are now the only ones that have a garrison that isn’t a standing army, means that the smaller surrounding holdings in the province can easily change hand. This is something that lends towards the goal of making the game more strategic. I like this change as it means you have to be prepared and look more into the potential future, watching your enemy’s movements closely and preparing to counter with your armies. It also makes it easier to manage your economy, military tech and other such categories of settlement building keeping them separate and focused. As well as being a nice more historically accurate take on the game.

 

-Recruitment;

 

The recruitment area of the game is much more realistic in a sense. You now only recruit a certain number of a unit’s strength instantaneously and over turns more troops are trained to join the unit and make it up to full strength. This means you can’t just buy a full army over a turn or so to defend any settlements that are to be imminently besieged. Recruitment of unit types are limited and only become available again when they are replenished, giving you limited access to higher tech units. Which gives recruitment a nice balance, again adding to the strategy side of things, which I feel makes it a nice addition.

 

-Loyalty, Legitimacy And Food Surplus;

These three aspects are important and if you don’t get the balance right things can go wrong fast. The most important in my experience is food surplus, if you cannot feed your armies and populace things really go south fast. Legitimacy of your rule and the loyalty of your generals and governors, whilst seemingly supposed to be important, was never an issue with me. Bar one civil war which I quickly quashed. Lesser legitimacy and war fervour comes with penalties as well as bonuses at higher levels but loyalty felt a little moot. You can easily buy off your underlings with giving them estates as well as adding loyalty points through character progression selecting the right option.  The family tree and character progression to me felt a little 2D but perhaps this is something that will change with the rebalancing of the game that is due?

 

 


– Stances;

There are only two options for stances which are raiding and encamping, you can gain further movement ability through technological advances as well as character progression. Which seems to simplify it all, streamlining it nicely and taking away the perils that come with forced marching.

 

-Battles;

 

 

The battles in this game play so smoothly and the UI is very streamlined. For example having smaller banners that reveal greater detail when needed, making the action much easier to follow and allowing you to more easily micro manage the combat.

In sieges there is the option to place barricades to create fall back points as well as choke points, I like this. However it could be more varied as to where you can place them. You don’t get the choice and there are limited options as seen below.

 

 

 

Instead of capturing towers as an attacker, the towers fall and are completely destroyed. I feel that they should remain as they have in other Total War games and work in advantage of the attacker to make things a little easier on them. This, in my opinion tips the balance in favour of defenders even more so than is necessary.

 

I have yet to experience naval battles however had the misfortune to be attacked by a superior force of Vikings by sea. Something that was quite the sight to behold. And a reason why I look forward to playing them in the future!

 

 

The only criticism I can find of this aspect is that the AI has a bit of a one track mind, at least on normal difficulty, only really attacking head on and in so doing, are easily beaten with the right balance in numbers and unit type. As well as your prowess as a general of course. Though for the most part I feel this game has given me some of the best battle gameplay I’ve had, the smoothness combined with how slick it is when it comes to managing large armies on the field is great stuff.

 

 

Conclusion

To surmise, this game is another great Total War game which really sums it up. If you’re a fan I feel you’ll love it, if you’re not it’s not going to pique your interest unless you’re really into the historical focal point. I wasn’t blown away beyond the art style and the chance to play a game focusing on my homeland. Which just goes to show the level of quality I’ve come to expect from Creative Assembly, it has become par for the course in their long line of successes.

I only have four criticisms of it that really come to mind. The first being that the difficulty is way too easy at present, the balancing needs to happen to make it more challenging. This may be good for those who aren’t as adept at strategy games and would be a good entry level to the series in its current state. However seasoned veterans obviously find this a bit off putting.

The second is that some of the new and reintroduced features seem a tad fickle, for example the loyalty and family tree appear to hardly have much of an impact and is easily manageable even when playing like a lacklustre fool such as I.

Thirdly, I felt the story element of the game was slightly lacking, perhaps for example in game historical battles could have been added as missions to relive the periods actual happenings if you so choose to follow that path. Although overall it does a good job of capturing the cultures and era historically and the story telling is sufficient, it doesn’t hurt to ask for more.

The final is not an outright criticism as much as it is a selling point, obviously with the scope of the game being focused on a smaller historical and geographical period the depth of this game isn’t as wide and varying as say the Warhammer series of Total War. But if you’re looking to get stuck into the world of Britannia in this period of time, it’s a solid offering that you’ll have great fun playing.

A nice more strategically minded game that does require greater forward thinking tactical foresight in your play style, despite the easiness of victory and handling of adverse situations, something that I hope the tweaks to the balancing fixes. It’s beautifully made both visually and with regards to its smoothness of game mechanics and ease of use of the very functionally streamlined UI, I would definitely recommend this game. Especially to fans of the franchise, naturally.

 

It will be interesting to see what updates are in the pipeline. And of course I am eagerly anticipating the Three Kingdoms instalment and will be writing on how its development is doing and what we can expect from it in the coming weeks.

 

Finally, I give this game over 100 wolf hounds chasing 3 Vikings…

 

 

 

 

Total War Saga: Thrones Of Britannia- A New Legacy For Some Old Familiar

 

 

Developed by Creative Assembly, Total War is a game series for history enthusiasts and strategy game lovers alike. Spanning many ages and geographical locations, from the Shogun age of Japan, the Roman ages all the way through to the times of the Napoleonic Wars and the age of Empire which featured new continents as the known world expanded. Most recently the franchise has dived head first into a series of Warhammer Fantasy Total War games to great success.

Just take a look at Creative Assemblys’ long lineage of titles beginning at the start of this millennium with Shogun, they’ve started to become a part of our history themselves;
Total war list

This article will be focusing on the Thrones of Britannia title, which has been pushed back to be released on the 3rd of May. Good, you can’t rush a good thing. Unless you’re just in it for the money ….
For those of you who don’t know the franchise I’ll give you a quick rundown on the style and gameplay of it just to set the scene a little, those of you who do. Maybe skip this section now and move on to the next subheading where I get stuck into the newest instalment.

It is essentially a grand strategy campaign map in the vein of the classic Civilization games of the 90’s and beyond, but with the twist of real time strategy combat thrown in. To speak of it in 90’s gaming terms of antiquity it’s as if the Civ and Command and Conquer series had a child at the turn of the millennium. Kinda …  I’m getting a bit carried away there, but I digress.

What I’m saying is, this series combines RTS battle gameplay and tactics with a large-scale grand strategy turn based campaign map which features management of different aspects of your faction, from keeping the populace happy, city building, tech researching to army building. As well as of course army movement and depending on which TW game you’re talking about, potentially much more.

But usually the faction management isn’t too in depth like other such grand strategy games, for example, Crusader Kings which has a great more deal to consider and deal with. TW on the other hand is usually simpler than most but with enough depth to make your decisions matter and for you to take note of your actions, for the most part of the series at least. I felt it lacking in some titles. Overall though I find you can take control without things getting too bewildering, which is a plus for a simpleton such as I who manages to give away my entire kingdom in Crusader Kings with a simple confused click.

I love this intertwining of slow, turn based planning and decision making combined with the faster paced action of unit based RTS combat of large scale armies. It’s just a mix that works so well, as I find I often get disinterested without controlling units in combat and feel like I’m watching the computer play out the game for me personally when I can’t influence battles directly. I like to have a say in things at a ground level as well as at an overarching god emperor level.

Without further ado onto the game at hand and what’s new and old this time round with a focus on what I’m looking forward to and what I’m fearful of…
Setting And Historical Focus

Since my younger days I have always wanted a TW game that focused on an historical aspect of my home islands … small though they may be, there has been some big history here, as with most places. I’ve always wanted to see one that focused on the isles where I was born, being biased and all, so I’m super excited about this one and supposedly it’s going to be the most detailed version of Britain ever to feature yet, 23 times bigger than the Atilla campaign map! Which is interesting considering the size of the subject matter being one of the smallest areas of land dealt with, more on that later.

Britannia takes place after the eventful saga of Viking Ragnar Lodbroks’ epic insurgencies into the British Isles through which the raiders from the North gained a foothold amongst the existing kingdoms. Ragnar died at the hands of the Anglo-Saxons, his sons swiftly took revenge raiding the isles and splintering kingdoms in a trail of slaughter that swept westwards. This game is focused around the clash of kingdoms between the Welsh, Gaelic, Anglo-Saxon and both the Great Viking army and Great Viking sea kings. Your fight to rule Britannia will ensue between these clashing cultures and ambitious powers.

Check out this trailer that does more justice than I in setting the scene for the newest fight you’ll be swept up in for your quest to make history;

 



As a history lover in general, with a particular penchant for this period of time in the formative years of the now apparently ‘United’ Kingdom in which I live, I cannot wait to play out this saga. And am looking forward to seeing how the history aspect of the different cultures and lands plays out in this one. Something TW is usually pretty good on although not always 100% in the name of balance and gameplay. Which as a self-proclaimed semi history buff can be forgiven, if it makes it a more enjoyable experience, after all it’s foremost a game and not History 101.

 
Campaign Map And Style

As previously mentioned (as far as my geography knowledge goes) this is the smallest location ever put into TW form,  and it is the most detailed map of Britain yet.  Splintered down into many provinces inhabited by a wide variety of factions, 10 of them playable. As can be seen below;
FACTIONS.jpg

 

Each province has a capital city with a web of connected smaller and weaker towns unfurling outwards across the land about the capital. I suppose this is where the most detailed part comes in. There are much more building slots for capitals focusing on military and more prestigious buildings, with the little orbiting towns being more focused around fewer slots and economy slots more specifically. However, of course these profitable towns and villages are smaller easier targets and so being, must be protected more closely or can be exploited in enemy territory.

I think this will suit the play style of factions well and add dynamism to the game, what with the raiding and pillaging of Vikings as well as the castle and garrison style warfare of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms for example. I feel this will do nicely especially since there’s so much more to focus on strategically and tactically in both defensive and offensive situations, with the extra detail added. Nice one but as ever we shall see how it works once released.

If you’d like to know more in depth facts about the map and the historical aspects of it as well as size comparison to previous games, check out TWs’ blog post map reveal here.

Just a quick note on style, I love the sort of ‘Ye Olde’ look they’ve gone for with the unit cards and character portraits, nice to the eye and thematically pleasing as well as varied enough to tell units apart. See below;

 

 

UNIT CARDS.jpg

 

 

Tech And Recruitment

 

Now for something a bit different and new, which I think in theory sounds grand. Instead of your unit upgrades being linked to what level buildings you have, they are now to be linked to what tech you have. Sounds much more logical and realistic if you ask me, you wouldn’t need to rebuild training grounds every time you get a new type of advanced unit, just the equipment and training really, right?  So once the required training grounds are completed, you need to upgrade using your tech tree choices.

Tech is also more difficult to reach, making you work more for those unlocks and advancements. You have to meet prerequisites such as having enough of a specific unit type before being able to research further down the line of tech. It’s more learning by doing than just choose, click, and wait. More of a goal to aim for. Additionally there are restrictions on the type of tech re-searchable by each faction that can be unlocked by discovering their potential from other locales and cultures on the map.  The building options remain geographically specific, however you can unlock the tech to utilise them once you venture into these areas and capture them.

Again, logical and realistic I feel. Making the maps location more geographically meaningful and influential, something I’ve always liked in TW games, with regards to holding resources and region specific unit types. So glad to see this being taken into account with tech giving variety to play style depending who and where you are.

When you unlock units to recruit, armies that are in the stance ‘fortify’ can recruit from a global pool wherever they are on the map. Not exactly new, except when you take into account you do not get the full unit, only a quarter of their full size.  You must spend longer, waiting turns to muster them up to the complete outfit. I think that to be a nice touch that also brings a bit of, (third mention now) logical realism to the matter and I’m a sucker for the more realistic side of gaming so am very happy about all this. It brings a nice bit of balance and another side of strategy to it, meaning that you can’t just whip up massive hordes if you’re rich. You too have to wait and therefore make better prior planning and preparation.

Making strategy and tactics the name of the game (as of course it is)  as well as a bit of historical realism, like it, like it.

 

NICE ONE BRUV.gif

 

Character Progression, Loyalty And Dilemmas

In Britannia there is some old familiar in the progression of generals and rulers, however they have done away with the skill trees and allowed a more natural development via action based progression. Characters have 3 fundamental stats; governance command and zeal. They will each develop as they do the respective jobs of fighting or governing, with zeal acting as a bonus multiplier on the other 2 stats.

I really think this is great, giving you more choice to focus and hone the characters for the roles you want, rather than choosing from an almost identical blanket of perks from a skill tree. In the past you would gain followers of your court by sheer chance, now you can influence which you get by picking them yourselves whenever a character levels up, giving specific bonus boosts to the character.

Loyalty has been brought back into play for this one meaning your generals and governors can defect if things aren’t favourable regarding you in their eyes. You can appease people with landed titles and estates dished out when you want to placate a particularly ungrateful bugger. Bringing this back is great as it gives a bit more to keep an eye out for with regards to ambitious jealous rebels, like back in the good old days of the earlier games such as Medieval TW.

Dilemmas are pop-up text events such as the ones you would get in the likes of Crusader Kings or other such Paradox games. These offer you choices on how to respond , as well as giving a more eventful play through, adding yet another avenue with which to influence the game. They are designed to give historical context and help influence your fight for victory, with possible negative outcomes also of course.

Often there is very little choice to how to respond which lets these kind of in game choices down, so I’m hoping they will be done justice, be interesting and be more than just an annoyance you rapidly click off the screen.

 


War Weariness And War Fervour

Not exactly a new mechanic, however it has been updated. Using a sliding scale which you have to balance to keep your populace content. To keep it short and sweet, if you aren’t at war for a long period – people are going to get mad and want to fight. If you’re at war too much, they’re going to get mad and need a break.  Some people eh?

This is great for the strategic and planning aspect of the game, you can’t just have all out …. erm … total war? Can you? It’s in the name … but like … it’s not really possible in reality. Something the Americans learnt in Vietnam.

I look forward to this annoying me as I love to constantly be fighting and over expanding to point of collapse. Ah well, better put a leash on myself in that case.

If you’d like to have a closer look at some of the new developments in this game I’ve touched on in a way which explains them with visual aids of the gameplay and UI have a little look at this. As it embellishes a little on what I’ve touched  upon;

 

 

DLC And Non-Playable Factions

In the good old early days of the franchise you could actually unlock previously unplayable factions by completing campaigns. Now and for a long time, the game has been taking every opportunity to introduce micro-transactions and DLC. Payable features to unlock more diverse parts of the games,  that just used to be a part of the game. Widespread practice these days I know, but that doesn’t mean we should accept it as their consumers. It just sours the whole experience and takes away from the progression and meaning of victory and the overall diversity in who you can play as, what units you can field. Variety is the spice of life after all.

Take one of the hitherto latest instalment in this long line of great titles, the Warhammer takes on the game. Both amazing in many ways in my opinion however not without their criticisms. My main gripe being they brought out two separate games in quick succession with absolutely oodles of DLC which when combined cost more than the game itself and didn’t really add more than factions you could have been rewarded with as unlockables…. ah well. Profit is profit. But when you’re bringing out a £1.99 blood and gore DLC to be added to the game, you’ve gotta start questioning your morality.

I haven’t seen any news on DLC in this game but I’m not holding my breath for a micro-transaction free game knowing the history and trend. Ah well, can’t have everything but we will see, perhaps this can be the redemption and return of rewards for beating the game in the TW series. Considering that previous  negative backlash disheartened Creative Assembly, it seems likely it’s their end game to make these extra costs a permanent feature.

 

All in all what seems to be minuscule changes to the outside eye, seem to me to be actual fine tuning and honing the game to better deliver the crème de la crème of what TW can offer fans. Except in the world of DLC and the game actually rewarding you.

Using their years of experience to deliver and effect positive changes that are going to have big implications on play style and the strategising and decision making side of things. Switching things up for the better. It appears the team behind this game have designed the map and factions around historical accuracy and great gameplay. Combining both to create what I feel could be the best TW title to date.

This focussing on yet more specific periods of history shows that we can expect yet more new sagas to come in this old familiar series. I for one welcome this, as every culture and region of history should be explored in this game style I believe, it’s a game series that just begs for more to be released and justifiably so I’d say. Even with the new found tendency for DLC and micro-transaction cash grabs …. the games themselves tend to not be cash cows.

I wager that this release will be what lovers of the game are looking for, the old tried and tested formula that works well, with a hint of added freshness for us to all salivate over. Exactly why I’ve pre-ordered it and am subconsciously counting down to its launch.